Board of Directors

At the 2019 Self Determination Conference, the DVU board stands in two lines in front of a white backdrop with the DVU and conference logos, all smiling

Judy Mark

President
Parent, Los Angeles

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Judy Mark has a 23-year old son with autism, which led her to become co-founder and President of Disability Voices United.  Judy leads DVU’s advocacy and programmatic efforts. Judy was instrumental in the passage of the Self-Determination Law and has been active in the implementation as a member of the DDS workgroup, Chair of Westside Regional Center’s local advisory committee, and a member of the Statewide Advisory Committee. Judy has written and edited two books on the Self-Determination Program and has spoken extensively throughout California and trained thousands of individuals and families.

Also a faculty member at UCLA, Judy teaches undergraduate courses in the Disability Studies Program. She recently led the Autism Media Lab which produced seven short documentaries on the inclusion of people with non-speaking autism. Her past professional experience includes over 30 years with national policy organizations, most extensively focusing on immigrant and refugee rights.

Judy has a BA from UCLA in Communications Studies and a Masters in Politics and Public Policy from the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University with coursework at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. Judy lives in L.A. with her husband, attorney Allen Erenbaum, and son, Joshua, and she visits her daughter, Emma, often at Barnard College at Columbia University in New York.

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Fernando Gomez

Vice President
Parent, Los Angeles

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Mr. Gomez is an industry expert on multicultural marketing with an emphasis on niche markets and has held senior positions with top corporations including Televisa, Microsoft, and France Telecomm.

He is also a passionate advocate for individuals with special needs, including his son with Down syndrome. He was appointed by Governor Brown to the Interagency Coordinating Council on Early Intervention (ICC) and was involved in several boards including the Board of Directors (past Chairman) for Westside Regional Center, and past President, Board of Directors of ARCA (Association of Regional Center Agencies).

He also served on the Board of Directors for the Special Olympics of Southern California (SOSC) and Latino Entertainment Media Institute. He is a member of the state workgroup on self-determination as well as the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP). He resides in Los Angeles with his wife, Elizabeth, and sons, 13-year old Oscar Antonio, and 11-year old, Diego.

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Diana Pastora Carson

Secretary
Sibling, Jamul

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Diana Pastora Carson, M.Ed. has been an educator for over 20 years. She is a consultant and trainer on diversity as it relates to disability and is the author of several articles and books including Beyond Awareness: Bringing Disability into Diversity Work in K-12 Schools & Communities, and children’s book, Ed Roberts: Father of Disability Rights.

Her Ability Awareness work has earned her statewide PTA recognitions in the areas of advocacy and outreach, as well as her school’s designation of Teacher of the Year. She has also been featured on several radio programs, and served two terms on the Board of Directors of Disability Rights California. Diana credits her passion for this work to her brother, Joaquin, who endured years of segregated schooling and subsequent institutionalization. And she takes the most pride in knowing that Joaquin now lives a life of inclusion in the community, as her next-door neighbor.

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Rick Wood

Treasurer
Parent, Mammoth Lakes

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Rick Wood is the parent of Davis Wood who has been a participant in the KRC Self-Determination Project for over 20 years. Rick is a California attorney who has actively participated as a parent-advocate and speaker at numerous California and national special needs and self-determination conferences. He currently serves as co-chair of the Statewide Self-Determination Advisory Committee, chair of the Kern Regional Center Self-Determination Local Advisory Committee, and has served for six years on the DDS self-determination workgroup.

Rick served on the Mammoth Lakes Town Council from 1998 through 2006 and 2010 through 2014, including 6 years as Mammoth’s mayor. Rick Wood has been a practicing attorney in California for over 40 years. He holds a BA from the University of California, Santa Barbara, a Juris Doctor degree from Santa Clara University, and a Masters in Taxation from Golden Gate University. He lives in Mammoth Lakes with his wife, Cheryl, and son, Davis, age 24.

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Ann Bui

Sibling
Sacramento

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Ann holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from University of Illinois Chicago and a Master of Science in Health Care Administration and Change Management from California State University East Bay. Over the past 20 years, Ann’s diverse professional experiences included serving as a long-term Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) fellow at the UC Davis MIND Institute and Santa Clara County Public Health Policy Aide for County Board Supervisor Ken Yeager. Currently, Ann is the Program Director at the California Foundation for Independent Living Centers (CFILC). Ann enjoys discovering new local cafes, hiking trails, spending time with her partner and rescue kittens, and supporting as well as advocating for Martin, her brother with autism and Traumatic Brain Injury.

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Vivian Haun

Sibling
Los Angeles

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Vivian’s experiences advocating for her brother, Brian, who has autism, sparked her passion for inclusion, equity, and disability issues.  After obtaining a master’s degree in Education Administration and Policy Analysis from Stanford University and a law degree from UCLA School of Law’s Public Interest Law and Policy Program, Vivian practiced special education law for several years.  In this role, she advised school districts and charter schools across California on due process and other special education litigation matters.

More recently, Vivian returned to policy work as the Manager for Special Education at the California Charter Schools Association, where she worked with schools, Special Education Local Plan Areas (SELPAs), and state agencies to ensure that charter schools had the resources they needed to serve a greater number and wider range of students with disabilities.  She also focused on implementation of California’s Competitive Integrated Employment Blueprint, which calls for stronger employment outcomes for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

In addition to Disability Voices United, Vivian also serves on the boards of CalAPSE, the California chapter of a national organization dedicated to the right of individuals to employment in an inclusive workforce; and Kids Included Together, a nonprofit that provides training and coaching to community organizations on how to include children with disabilities.  She continues to advocate for her brother as he starts in the Self-Determination program and begins to live independently in his own home for the first time.  Vivian is based in Los Angeles.

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Stephen Hinkle

Self-Advocate
Orange

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Stephen Hinkle is a disability rights advocate and international speaker. He has spoken across 24 states and in Australia on topics such as autism, inclusion, and disability advocacy. Stephen is currently working on his PhD in disability policy at Chapman University.  He has his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University in Computer Science and Masters degree from Northern Arizona University in Disability Policy Studies. Stephen is also a former special education student who is on the autism spectrum.

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Tim Jin

Self-Advocate
Fountain Valley

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A self-advocate with cerebral palsy, Tim graduated from Cal State Long Beach in speech communication. He currently works for Teacher Created Resources. Tim has been an active member on several advisory boards, such as IHSS, USC UCEDD, and Self-Determination Program Local Advisory Committee for Regional Center of Orange County.

Tim has been using an AAC device ever since he was in elementary school.  One of his passions is for everyone to communicate through technology, whatever that happens to be.  It doesn’t matter what your disability is, everyone needs to communicate.

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Kelly Kulzer-Reyes

Parent
Pine Mountain Club

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Kelly Kulzer-Reyes is mom to three children: Noah, 9, Amelia, 7, and Simon, 2. Shortly after Amelia’s birth, Kelly became involved in legislative advocacy for people with Down syndrome and other disabilities. Kelly and her husband, Moses, live in Pine Mountain Club, California in the Kern County mountains. They are grateful for the community they have found at Club 21 in Pasadena, California, which has supported Kelly in her advocacy work. Kelly serves on the board of Disability Voices United and is a parent leader at Kern Down Syndrome Network. Kelly works as an English professor at Taft College in Taft, California.

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Connie Lapin

Parent
Northridge

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A speech pathologist, Connie Lapin has been a lecturer and family advocate for children and adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders and other developmental disabilities for over 50 years. When her son Shawn was diagnosed in 1970, there was a dearth of information and no services available.

Connie has testified before government bodies, lectured at universities and conferences, and made appearances on television and radio. Connie’s accolades include “Woman of the Year” in Assemblyman Bob Blumenfield’s district, and a Lifetime Achievement and Meritorious Service for Autism from Senate Pro Tem Darryl Steinberg. Connie and her husband, Harvey, recently received a commendation from the California State Senate for their contribution to advancing the rights of people with developmental disabilities.

As current co-chair of the Government Relations Committee for the Autism Society of Los Angeles, she helped lead the successful effort in California to enact Self-Determination legislation that was signed in October 2013 by Governor Brown.

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Leroy Moore

Self-Advocate
Berkeley

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Leroy F. Moore Jr., Founder of the Krip-Hop Nation.  Since the 1990s, has written the column “Illin-N-Chillin” for POOR Magazine. Moore is one of the founding member of National Black Disability and activist around police brutality against people with disabilities.  Leroy has started and helped started organizations like Disability Advocates of Minorities Organiztion to Sins Invalid to Krip-Hop Nation.  His cultural work includes film documentary, Where Is Hope, Police Brutality Against People with Disabilities, spoken-word CDs, poetry books like, The Black Kripple Delivers Poetry & Lyrics has been published by Poetic Matrix Press in the Winter of 2015 and children’s book, Black Disabled Art History 101 published by Xochitl Justice Press.  His graphic novel,  Krip-Hop Graphic Novel Issue 1: Brown Disabled Young Woman Super Hereo Brings Disability Justice to Hip- Hop was published by Poor Press in early 2019.  Moore has traveled  internationally networking with other disabled activists and artists.  Moore has wrote, sang and collaborated to do music videos on Black disabled men and has been on the college lecture circuit since 1999.

Born in 1967 with cerebral palsy in NYC, Leroy Moore, Jr. was blessed to have a conscious, activist father & mother who instilled a strong sense of identity as a Black and disabled youngster. Thus, Moore’s Krip-Hop Nation is a movement that addresses ableism, or discrimination against disabled artists, esp. Black musicians marginalized because of racism & ableism.

Krip-Hop Nation has over 300 members worldwide who get their message out by publishing articles and hosting events, lectures and workshops.  Moore is a leading activist on issues of wrongful incarceration and police brutality against people with disabilities.

As a youth, Moore discovered that most people had little knowledge of the historical impact of disabled African Americans. This led him to begin research, initially in the music industry, and to promote artists with disabilities for broader inclusion. Moore is a leading activist on issues of wrongful incarceration and police brutality against people with disabilities.

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Alison Morantz

Parent
Palo Alto

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Alison Morantz moved to California in 2004 to join the faculty of Stanford Law School, where she directs the Stanford Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Law and Policy Project (SIDDLAPP), and teaches contracts, employment law, and mental health law.  Her son, who has autism and serious mental illness, lives in the community after spending years receiving treatment away from home.

Despite the complexity of his condition, he enjoys considerable day-to-day autonomy, has free access to the outdoors, and sees his family frequently.  Alison and her husband were founding members of the Parent Advisory Board of the Stanford Autism Center.  They continue to advocate for their son and other individuals with developmental disabilities, especially those with co-occurring mental illness.

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Eden Rapp

Self-Advocate
Manhattan Beach

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Eden Rapp works at MOD Pizza in Rolling Hills Estates and music is her passion.  Her goals are to become a stronger self-advocate, a woman of faith, and to learn how to be independent. In 2019, she lobbied in Washington, D.C. for 2 bills as a National Down Syndrome Society ambassador. After talking with her senators’ staff about The Transformation to Competitive Employment Act, in fact, Kamala Harris decided to co-sponsor that bill. She also lobbied for the Marriage Access Act for people with special needs so that getting married does not force them to lose benefits.

Eden also leads a club for young adults with disabilities to become stronger self-advocates and better readers. She also teaches them independence like money skills, safety, how to have meaningful conversations, and more.  In 2019, Eden participated in a webinar called Finding Your Voice, which inspired her to come up with her own curriculum. She has led workshops for the National Down Syndrome Congress conventions. To help her become a better speaker, she is part of Toastmasters, and earned her Competent Communicator award in 2019.

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Carolyn Tellalian

Parent
Fresno

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Carolyn Tellalian is a mom to three children: Ryan, 36; Marisa, 31; and Vana, 29. Shortly after Marisa’s birth, Carolyn became involved in organizing community resources surrounding the Down syndrome and disability community in Tulare and Fresno County. Carolyn collaborated with another mom, Michelle Smith, to design, fund and launch the post-secondary education program Wayfinders at Fresno State. She is a licensed clinical social worker at Valley Children’s Hospital in Madera and lives in Fresno. Recently, Carolyn became involved in legislative advocacy. Carolyn serves on the board of Disability Voices United and is on the Local Advisory Committee for Self-Determination at Central Valley Regional Center.

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